Christians and Death — Shouldn’t it be party time?

Posted: April 23, 2014 in Atheism, Christianity, Psychology, Religion
Tags: , , ,

Front cover of "The Heretic's Handbook of Quotations

 

by Chaz Bufe, compiler/editor of The Heretic’s Handbook of Quotations, and See Sharp Press editor

I was talking yesterday about the fear of death with one of the See Sharp Press authors, and how incongruous it seems that religious “believers” are so often terrified of death. The author mentioned that his  sister teaches at a Catholic university on the West Coast, and during a recent conversation she’d said that one of her colleagues, a Catholic priest, was dying of cancer.  When the priest told her of this, she’d said to him that his religious faith must be a great source of comfort. He admitted that it wasn’t, and that he was terrified. Score one for the priest: at least he was honest about it.

That begs the question, why are so many devout Christians, who stoutly maintain that they look forward to everlasting life in heaven, terrified of death? The obvious answer is that their actual beliefs do not match their professed beliefs. They desperately want to believe in an afterlife, but they don’t actually believe in it.

This explains a lot, including why “believers” routinely do everything in their power, even in extreme old age, to stave off death. It also explains why they’re so often hostile to atheists: the pointed words of nonbelievers threaten to burst their carefully constructed wishful-thinking bubbles. If “believers” actually believed, they wouldn’t care what atheists say. But they do. Like frightened children, they stomp their feet, howl angrily, and lash out at those who say anything that calls their wishful thinking into question.

A related aspect of this childish clinging to comforting illusions is that “believers” are pathetically eager to hear their “beliefs” parroted by others. The “reasoning” is that if everyone says their particular brand of bullshit is true, it must be true. Hence childhood religious indoctrination. Hence the perennial popularity of priests and preachers, no matter how transparently phony. Hence the huge industry in Christian books and videos, almost all of which flatter their fear-driven consumers (“the chosen,” “the elect,” “God’s people”), and tell them exactly what they want to hear.

In itself, this is enough to explain why so many Christians are terrified of death. But there’s one additional reason: atheists accept death as inevitable. For the most part we’re far from happy about it, but we accept it.  And most of us have had decades to come to terms with our own mortality. Religious “believers,” on the other hand, have spent their entire lives pretending that death doesn’t exist. They’ve spent their entire lives not coming to terms with it. So when they come face to face with death, they’re terrified.

 

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