Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category


Yep, what Louis C.k. did was pretty gross.  Pretty obnoxious. And it leaves you wondering, WHY? What on earth why did he do it? He had all the money and fame in the world, and could have gotten laid any time he wanted. (Don’t deny it — a lot of women will flock to fame and fortune. As an early episode of the best sci-fi comedy ever, Red Dwarf, put it, “”With that kind of money, anybody will spread their legs.”)

How could that type of degradation possibly gratify anyone? Especially a progressive type like Louis C.K., who seems to take delight in skewering that type of sickness, and in being ruthlessly honest about male-female relationships?.

(Trump’s golden showers at least seem to have the point of being grossly misogynistic, grossly degrading to women, allowing him to feel like the alpha male — a species which should be shot on sight,  or  preferably gelded.)

Well, the explanation is pretty damn straight forward: Louis had power. It changed him. And hence he abused it.

He’s admitted what he did. There was little if any coercion, and he misbehaved horribly. He’s admitted it. That’s much better than “pussy grabber” Trump. And it’s way  better than pedophile “Christian Conservative” Roy Moore. At least Louis is honest.

Once Louis apologizes to the women he offended — still waiting for that–it”ll be time to forgive and forget. but not until he apologizes; and I think he’s big enough to do this

In the meantime, nothing will change as long as some people have power over others.

Male, female, it doesn’t matter. As long as some have power over others, they’ll abuse them.

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Willie Edwards, "Everlastin' Tears"

Police state on the rise

By the same old guys

With the same old lies

Comes as no surprise

Well it’s very plain to see

They want your liberty

Police state

Police state

Police state

Police state . . . . .

We’re trying to get Willie down here (from Vermont)  to do some live performing and to record a new album later this winter.

We’ll keep you posted about the new label.

The band is back up, and we’re doing a bunch of mostly (so far) unrecorded blistering political blues, most prominently “Private Prison Blues,” and will record two new full CDs of original material — some political, some just funny and self-mocking — over the next few months. It’ll mostly be blues, but also blues-rock, latin rock, blues-jazz, straight jazz,  New Orleans funk-blues, country rock, funk rock, straight country, and western swing. In other words, it’ll be what Gatemouth Brown, refusing to be pigeonholed, called “American Music.”

We hope to get Willie Edwards down here to record at least one new CD, and maybe two, as a way to launch the new label, along with new CDs by the Pinche Blues Band, Al Perry, Brian Hullfish, and one or two other local bands.

 

For now, check out the Pinche Blues Band site where we have all of the songs from the first two EPs up as free mp3s.

Enjoy. And stay tuned.


“Perhaps, if the existence of an evil being were allowed, who, in the allegorical language of scripture, went about seeking whom he could devour, he could not more effectually degrade the human character than by giving a man absolute power.

“. . . birth, riches, and every extrinsic advantage that exalt a man above his fellows without any mental exertion sink him in reality below them. In proportion to his weakness, he is played upon by designing men, till the bloated monster has lost all traces of humanity.”

–Mary Wollstonecroft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women


A century ago, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky, and their henchmen — Beria, Stalin, et al. — betrayed the Russian people.

They took power in a coup, proclaiming “all power to the soviets,” the soviets being worker-controlled assemblies in manufacturing, transportation, and distribution — worker control of the economy, in other words.

Once in power, Lenin and the Bolsheviks immediately destroyed the soviets, centralizing control in their hands in Moscow.

They instituted the Cheka, the secret police, which murdered over 100,000 people during Lenin’s brief but brutal rule, which ended in 1924.

Lenin (and Trotsky) paved the way for Stalin, through suppression of the soviets, through suppression of independent trade unions, through suppression of political opposition, through suppression of free speech. To pretend that all was well under Lenin is willful ignorance. He paved the way for Stalin.

And there’s no reason to talk further about Stalin. The horrors he committed are well known and were the logical outcome of the dictatorial, one-man rule he inherited from Lenin.

Those who followed, and those who still follow, Lenin (and Stalin), with their patented b.s. — “trust us, we know what we’re doing; it’s for your own good; it’s historically inevitable” — have done more harm to real social emancipation (controlling one’s daily life) than the forces of reaction could ever have dreamed of.

 

 


Fr. Fish Donald Trump graphic

(Graphic by Mr. Fish)

“The subordination of a nation to a man, is not a wholesome but a vicious state of things: needful, indeed for a vicious humanity. The instinct which makes it possible is anything but a noble one. Call it ‘hero worship’ and it looks respectable . . . From ancient warrior-worship down to modern flunkeyism, the sentiment has ever been strongest where human nature has been vilest.”

–Herbert Spencer, “Representative Government”


(The Moon and the Other, by John Kessell. New York: Saga Press, 596 pp. $27.99)

reviewed by Zeke Teflon

To understand The Moon and the Other, it’s helpful to be familiar with the reformist political current called identity politics. In the U.S., it’s been all the rage over the last few decades among liberals, especially among those in the corporate wing of the Democratic Party and those holding positions at Ivy League colleges and other elite East Coast institutions.

For those not familiar with the term, “identity politics” refers to the assumption that a person’s race, gender, and/or sexual orientation is the most important factor in politics, and that those in such groups should band together to further their own interests, making all other political goals secondary. The unspoken assumption is that everything is fine (or at least a minor problem) in comparison to the interests of the identity group.

This is a divisive, self-limiting political approach. It would be difficult to devise one better designed to distract from fundamental political and economic problems while fitting neatly into the existing political and economic power structure’s divide and conquer strategy.

More concretely, liberal political elites translate identity politics ideology into programs such as race-based admissions to universities and forced busing of school children to distant schools to give at least some poor minority kids access to better schools.

One wonders why those who foist such policies upon the public do not, instead, demand free higher education for all who want it (a fact in some European countries), and why they do not demand equal per-student funding for all public schools, thus ensuring reasonably high quality education for all students, not just some.

You’d have to ask those who advance such identity-politics “solutions” why this is so. My best guess is that they either: 1) see nothing fundamentally wrong with the existing politico-economic situation and just wish to make it marginally fairer to specific groups; 2) they see no hope of fundamentally changing that politico-economic situation and again just want to make it marginally fairer to specific groups; or 3) they’re conscious tools of the economic elites who fund their campaigns and their well paid positions in academia and the media.

The Moon and the Other’s background, the Society of Cousins (SoC), comes straight out of a virulent strain of this ideology, what one might term biology-is-destiny politics. The idea upon which the book revolves is that men are so violent and competitive that they must be disenfranchised, and that women, inherently peaceful and cooperative, must control society through a coercive political power structure — government. (On the surface, this concept is grossly insulting to men, but when you think about it it’s also grossly insulting to women, positing that they’re too weak to stand up to men in an egalitarian political and social structure.)

To provide contrast with his Society of Cousins, Kessell sets up Persepolis, another domed-crater society whose sketchily drawn political, economic, and social structure is all but indistinguishable from that of present-day liberal western democracies. (There’s also an all too brief, but perceptive, look at an Ayn Randist society.)

As the story begins, we meet the book’s protagonist, Erno who’s working as an immigrant in the bottom layer of Persepolis’ society after being exiled from the SoC for involvement in a “terrorist” dumb political stunt carried out by an extreme wing of the men’s right movement.

We shortly meet the novel’s two other central characters, both of them involved in the men’s rights dissident movement: Mira, the SoC’s unstable, immature, female version of Banksy, and Carey, her on-and-off boyfriend who resists being drawn into the movement despite his involvement in a high profile custody case.

All of these characters are well drawn, quite believable, as are several of the secondary characters, notably Hypatia, the charismatic, manipulative, intellectual leader of the dissident movement, and Sirius, an “uplifted” dog and leading newscaster in Persepolis.

Inevitably, years after the opening scenes, Erno, who has risen in life, is drawn back to the SoC as part of an Organization of Lunar States investigation of the status of men in the Society of Cousins, not incidentally at a time of the ascendancy of the men’s rights dissident movement.

The investigation is brought on, in part, by the SoC’s deletion of all published materials relating to its scientific and technical investigations over the previous thirty years. And here, Kessell posits not only internal deletion, but deletion by SoC hackers of all materials in electronic form everywhere, on both the moon and the Earth. Such an attempt would be ridiculous — doomed to failure — today, and it seems even more so set centuries in the future.

Worse, shortly after Erno’s arrival back in the SoC, Kessell throws the reader a curve. Rather than follow the struggle for men’s rights in this biologically determinist society — which, given how well the author has set up the situation, would be fascinating — Kessell presents the reader with two interwoven major events, which derail the course of the dissident movement.

Beyond that, the authors of the first event are never revealed, and their possible motives seem weak given the event’s drastic nature. As for the second related event, Kessell devotes quite a bit of space to establishing the motivation for the character responsible for it. However, a large amount of that motivation lies in the character’s resentment over his physical limitations — and those physical limitations would make his supposed actions all but impossible.

One minor problem with the book is that Kessell has an annoying habit of ending chapters or portions of chapters by revealing that something awful will happen, and then inserting pages of unnecessary material before revealing the nature of the event. That unnecessary material is there simply to keep the reader in a state of anxiety, and, for anyone who’s paying attention, that’s annoying.

In sum, the plot problems, unsatisfying conclusion, and manipulation of the reader outweigh the well drawn characters, interesting social background, and well set up social conflict. That’s unfortunate, because The Moon and the Other could have been a considerably better than average science fiction novel. As is, it’s a considerably more frustrating than average sci-fi novel.

Not recommended.

* * *

Zeke Teflon is the author of Free Radicals: A Novel of Utopia and Dystopia (pdf sample here). He’s currently working on the sequel and an unrelated sci-fi novel in his copious free time.

Free Radicals, by Zeke Teflon front cover

 


Alt-country player Al Perry’s song and video, “Jukebox Jihad,” has evidently fallen victim to the PC police — outraged by, what else?, “islamophobia” — and has been taken down by Youtube. (We put “censored” in quotes in the headline, because it’s within Youtube’s rights to only host what they want; but the political intent, the desire to restrict political speech, is obvious.)

Here’s the takedown notice:

If you haven’t heard the song, “Jukebox Jihad” is a rockabilly tune, light, funny mockery (admittedly in questionable taste) of the murderous religious fanatics who have slaughtered and enslaved tens, probably hundreds, of thousands of people, most of whom were/are their fellow Muslims.

We loathe attacks on free speech. We loathe anything smacking of censorship. And we loathe those who think they know what others should be allowed to see and hear.

So, we’ve just put up the “Jukebox Jihad” video on the See Sharp Press web site. I spoke with Al earlier this evening, and he encourages others to download “Jukebox Jihad” and put it up on their own sites.

Without further ado, here’s the link to “Jukebox Jihad.”