Archive for the ‘Christianity’ Category


THANKSGIVING, n. 1) A day on which thanks are given that one’s bloated, python-digesting-a-deer feeling will soon pass, and that the day will not recur for another year; 2) A five-course family feast consisting of tension, boredom, anger, recrimination, and guilt, held under the pretense of picking over the carcass of a murdered bird.

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— from The American Heretic’s Dictionary (revised & expanded), the 21st-century successor to Ambrose Bierce’s Devil’s Dictionary. (The link goes to 50 sample definitions and illustrations.)

American Heretic's Dictionary revised and expanded by Chaz Bufe, front cover


AGNOSTIC, n. 1. An atheist who craves social acceptance; 2) A person who feels superior to atheists by merit of his ignorance of the rules of logic and evidence.

(Adding weight to the second definition, Pew Research Center just released a poll showing that agnostics were two-and-a-half times more likely than atheists to hold at least one irrational new age belief [“new age” being pronounced as a single word starting with “s” according to Penn & Teller] — in spiritual energy; psychics; reincarnation; and/or astrology. Agnostics were only slightly less credulous in this regard than Christians.)

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— from The American Heretic’s Dictionary (revised & expanded), the 21st-century successor to Ambrose Bierce’s Devil’s Dictionary. (The link goes to 50 sample definitions and illustrations.)

American Heretic's Dictionary revised and expanded by Chaz Bufe, front cover


Chris Mato Nunpaby Chris Mato Nunpa, PhD
retired professor of History at Southwest Minnesota State University and author of the upcoming (Sept. 2019) The Great Evil: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous People of the United States

Back in October of 1947, I entered first grade at the Granite Falls Public Schools, Granite Falls, Minnesota, USA. This is when I first heard about a man named Christopher Columbus. As far as I can remember, I never heard my father or mother mention this person. When one of my teachers talked about Columbus, she taught us a poem which began, “In fourteen hundred ninety-two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.” This is a line that I have remembered, now that I am 78 “winters” on. The teacher taught us that Columbus “discovered” America. The second thing I remember is a picture of Columbus on the shore with a cross. In my mind, I thought, “Columbus must be a Christian. So, he must be a good man.” The Christian missionaries had taught us Dakota children, in the late 1940s, that Christians are good people because they are serving God, and that the cross was good and sacred. The white man’s educational system did, and does, very efficient teaching, or indoctrination, or brainwashing, along with help from his religious theology system, and the missionaries.

Later, as I grew up and became educated, I discovered that the things which I heard and learned not only in first grade in 1947, but also in the other grades up to 1959 when I graduated from high school, were mostly lies. Columbus DID NOT DISCOVER America, and that there were approximately 16 million, if not more, Indigenous Peoples already here in the continental United States. Columbus may have been the first western-European to make it to the Americas and even there, there is some debate about that. The other thing I learned was that Columbus was a bad man, a very bad man – that he and his soldiers killed millions of our Native Peoples on the islands of the Caribbean Sea. Columbus was a Genocidaire, a perpetrator of Genocide. This Genocide of the Native Peoples began what I call “The Great Evil,” which I discuss at length in my book of the same name, The Great Evil (Wosice Tanka Kin): Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the United States, to be published in September 2019.

Let me provide an incident which illustrates the cruelty and brutality of Columbus and his soldiers. In the course of Columbus’ making of war, what the Spanish called “pacification” to describe their campaign of terror and killing against the Indigenous peoples of the Caribbean. Las Casas, a Catholic missionary, witnessed an event. And I quote:

Spaniards found pleasure in inventing all kinds of odd cruelties, the more cruel the better, with which to spill blood. They built a long gibbet, low enough for the toes to touch the ground and prevent strangling, and hanged thirteen natives at a time in honor of Christ our Saviour and the twelve Apostles.

Note that Las Casas mentions that the Spaniards hanged and killed thirteen Native Peoples at a time “in honor of Christ out Saviour and the twelve Apostles.” In the upcoming book, The Great Evil (for September 2019 release), I’ll provide many specific Bible verses that were quoted by the killers of Indigenous Peoples in hundreds upon hundreds of genocidal massacres in the first four centuries the invaders, stealers, killers, and destroyers were here — the 1500s, the 1600s, the 1700s, and the 1800s.

Here are a few of the genocidal actions that were perpetrated against the First Nations Peoples of the Caribbean: using “ferocious dogs that had been trained to kill and disembowel”; Columbus’ troops “went wild, stealing, killing, raping, and torturing natives”; “would test their swords and their manly strength” on captured Indigenous Peoples by “slicing off of heads or the cutting of bodies in half with one blow”; “cutting off of hands” of Native Peoples if they did not bring in their quota of gold; tearing “babes from their mother’s breast by their feet, and dashed their heads against the rocks” (see Psalms 137:9, KJV); the soldiers would “rip open the bellies, to cut and kill those lambs – men, women, children, and old folk”; etc. In twenty-one years, 8 million Indigenous Peoples “had been killed by violence, disease, and despair” (compare with the more than the 6 million Jews killed by Hitler and his Nazis in WWII. These examples and information can be found in David Stannard’s book American Holocaust (1992, pp. x, & 69-72).

Let me quote a few comments from Dr. Ward Churchill:

As a symbol, Christopher Columbus vastly transcends himself. He stands before the bar of history and humanity, culpable not only for his deeds on Española, but, in spirit at least, for the carnage and cultural obliteration which attended the conquest of Mexico and Peru during the 1500s. He stands as exemplar of the massacre of Pequots at Mystic in 1637 . . . His spirit informed the policies of John Evans and John Chivington as they set out to exterminate the Cheyennes in Colorado during 1864, and it rode with the 7th U.S. Cavalry to Wounded Knee in December of 1890 . . . .  (A Little Matter of Genocide p. 92)

The arrival of Columbus began the period of “The Great Evil,” or Wosice Tanka Kin (a Dakota phrase), which has lasted for the past 526 years. In that period, 16 million people have been murdered in the continental United States, and anywhere from 110 to 125 million slaughtered in the Americas primarily by U.S. Euro-Americans and western Euro-Americans. Stannard writes, “The destruction of the Indians of the Americas was, far and away, the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world (Stannard, American Holocaust, p. x).

Columbus was an evil man.


RECTOCRACY, n. Government by assholes. The form of government that has replaced what once passed for democracy in the United States.

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— (thanks to Dave Irish for this one) from The American Heretic’s Dictionary (revised & expanded), the 21st-century successor to Ambrose Bierce’s Devil’s Dictionary. (The link goes to 50 sample definitions and illustrations.)

American Heretic's Dictionary revised and expanded by Chaz Bufe, front cover


Cartoon by Pamela Sutter

This portrait of J.C. lazing on a sunny afternoon is the latest from our friend Pamela Sutter, author and illustrator of May the Farce Be With You: A Lighthearted Look at Why God Does Not Exist

May the Farce be with You


Christians are fond of pointing out that the devil can quote scripture, and on Thursday Jeff Sessions did so, citing the Bible as justification for his and Trump’s policy of forcibly separating immigrant families. That policy has involved federal agents ripping babies and small children from their mothers’ arms; this is not hyperbole — Sessions’ and Trump’s uniformed thugs are doing exactly that.

Appropriately, Sessions cited Romans 13. Here are its first two verses:

Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.

Just why was it so appropriate for Sessions to cite this passage? It can be used to support any government and any of its actions, no matter how horrific. (Not coincidentally, Romans 13 was widely cited at the time of the American Revolution by royalists opposing the Revolution, and was likewise widely cited by slavery advocates in the run-up to the American Civil War.)

One can see how handy this passage is for the Trump regime.

What was Sessions trying to justify here? The Trump administration’s decision to rip immigrant families apart, to separate children from parents — a decision labeled child abuse by the American Association of Pediatricians.

Typically for Trump, he and his underlings have refused to take responsibility for their horrific actions: they’re attempting to shirk responsibility, to blame them, somehow, on others, in this case on the Democrats. As if they’re helpless to reverse the decision they made, helpless to reverse the policy they implemented. Their gutlessness is beyond slimy.

Almost worse, the Republicans have introduced bills in Congress to reverse this policy, but that also include $25 billion in funding for Trump’s border wall. So, they’ve torn children from their parents’ arms, are inflicting grievous psychological harm on the children, and are holding them hostage.

And Romans 13 gives them exactly the justification they need.

One would think this would make most Christians, especially those espousing “family values,” uncomfortable. Wrong. I just took a look at the web sites of the two most prominent “family values” political groups: James Dobson’s Focus on the Family site, and Tony Perkin’s Family Research Council site. There’s not a single damn word about this disgusting assault on vulnerable families on Dobson’s site.

And Perkins’ Family Research Council web site attempts to justify Trump’s and Sessions’ vicious policy: “It’s impossible to feel anything but compassion for these kids, who must be dealing with a great deal of pain and confusion. But the origin of that pain and confusion isn’t U.S. law or the Trump administration. That burden lies with their parents who knowingly put them in this position.”

As if Trump and Sessions bear no responsibility for this atrocity. This abusive policy was never implemented under any previous administration. And no, somehow, it’s not the fault of those who implemented it, but rather the responsibility of its victims. (And yeah, right, one can almost feel the compassion oozing out of Perkins.)

To be fair, evangelist Franklin Graham, Billy Graham’s son, has denounced Trump’s assault on families.

But most Christians, especially most evangelicals, haven’t.

Why? Let’s take another look at Romans 13. Fundamentalists claim to believe in the Bible literally (they don’t — only in the hate-filled, authoritarian parts of it that justify their cruelty), so they use it as a “get out of jail free” card for this horrible form of child abuse and the nauseating hypocrisy of the “ordained of God” Trump administration. They treat it as a “divine right of kings” card, more accurately a “Christians must kiss their authoritarian butts” card.

In fact, if you take Romans 13 literally, Christians must kiss all authoritarian butts that are seated in power, no matter who the butts belong to, and no matter what their owners’ political persuasions.

One would think that this would give pause to fundamentalists. For if Romans 13 is true, God ordained the suppression of Christianity in the Soviet Union under Lenin and Stalin.

If you believe literally in the teachings of Romans 13, you should have no problem with this. No problem with either Lenin or Stalin — they were “ordained of God,” as were their actions.

Hitler? The Holocaust? Not a problem. He was “ordained of God,” and those who resisted him “received unto themselves damnation.”

Many Christians have attempted to interpret Romans 13 in a way that blunts or negates its obvious meaning. Please. It speaks for itself. Others have pointed to more humane passages in the Bible, as if they mitigate the horrific message in Romans.

Either Romans 13 is true or it isn’t. And if it’s true, the passages humane Christians cite that contradict it point to only one conclusion: the Bible is a man-made artifact filled with contradictions. It’s not the word of God.

The other lesson from this sad, tawdry affair is that “pro-family Christians” who support Trump’s and Sessions’ vicious treatment of families are disgusting hypocrites, utter moral garbage.

 


Iain M. Banks

“‘. . . these crowds are, perversely, highly attractive to bombers.’

“‘Christians?’ Q’and says . . .

“‘Of course Christians, you idiot!’ . . . ‘The religion of zealotry,’ she informs him testily. ‘The religion that loves its martyrs, the religion of the doctrine of Original Sin, so that blowing even babies to smithereens is justifiable because they too are sinners.’ She jerks her head and makes a sort of dry spitting sound. ‘A religion made for terrorism.'”

–“Madame d’Ortolan” and “Q’and” in Iain M. Banks’ parallel-worlds novel, Transition