Posts Tagged ‘Multi-Level Marketing’


Here’s the latest installment in our ever-popular Internet Crap series, which mixes links to sick and absurd but amusing crap with links to useful crap. Enjoy!

  • Feeling a bit down, a bit left out, like you just don’t fit in? You might be a psychopath. Then again, you might not. Find out now with Channel 4‘s  Psychopathic Traits test. Their Spot The Psychopath game is also good, clean fun.
  • If you’re a writer, you’ll want to check out Ralan.com. It has by far the best collection of useful links for writers that we’ve ever seen. (Thanks to Ted Weber, author of Sleep State Interrupt, for this one.)
  • We hear a lot lately about Donald Trump and fascism. For a good, short dissection of the topic, check out Chris Hedges’ “Trump and the Christian Fascists.” (If the title of the piece aroused your curiosity, no, veteran journalist Hedges is not a militant atheist — he’s an ordained Presbyterian minister.)
  • If you’ve ever wondered why so many MLM and other scams target conservative religious believers, wonder no more. Mette Harrison does a good job of explaining it in “10 reasons Mormons dominate multi-level marketing companies” on the Religion News Service site.
  • The Guardian reports that earlier this year, a 21-year-old Spanish student, Cassandra Vera from the Murcia region, was convicted of “glorifying terrorism” and sentenced to a year in jail for a series of jokes she posted on Twitter in 2013. The funniest one concerned the 1973 assassination of Admiral Luis Carrero Blanco, the Spanish prime minister during the last years of the Franco dictatorship.  Carrero Blanco was killed when the Basque terrorist group ETA detonated a huge bomb beneath a street as Carrero Blanco’s car passed over it, with the explosion hurling the vehicle nearly 70 feet into the air. That’s a long set-up for Vera’s joke, but necessary to understanding it. Here’s the joke, and it’s worth the wait: “ETA launched a policy against official cars combined with a space program.”
  • In these days of “fake news” and deliberate muddying of the waters by the president and his enablers, how do you tell what’s real from conspiracy theories? Hero whistleblower John Kiriakou, who was viciously persecuted by the Obama administration and spent nearly two years in jail as a result, tells us how in “How to Challenge Media Narratives Without Being Called a Conspiracy Theorist.”
  • Ever wonder what’s the most effective thing individuals can do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Environmental Research Letters reports that, as should be blindingly obvious by now, the most effective individual action by far is to have fewer kids. (Of course, organized crime — the Catholic Church, LDS church, et al. — will never admit this, because they don’t care about the environment nor the common good; they just want more money and more blindly believing foot soldiers.)
  • We seem to constantly hear about the “civilizing effects” of religion. Here’s a prime example from a deeply devout area, in this case a deeply devout Islamic area. The title says it all in the CNN report, “Pakistani village elders order retaliatory rape of 17-year-old girl.” One can only imagine what these people would be up to without the “civilizing effects” of their “great religion.”
  • Since no Internet Crap post would be complete without at least one link to a cybersecurity how-to story, here you go. The Intercept has an enlightening piece in comic-book format titled “How to protect yourself against spearfishing: A comic explanation.”
  • If you were puzzled as to why so many Alabama “values voters” were ready and willing to vote for an alleged (have to get that in there) pedophile, Kathryn Brightbill does a good job of explaining it in her Los Angeles Times op ed, “Roy Moore’s alleged pursuit of a young girl is the symptom of a larger problem in evangelical circles.”
  • Finally, in still more religion news, the AP reports that “a woman shot her boyfriend in the head after he asked her to kill him because he thought the leader of a cult they belonged to was a reptile posing as a human.”

And . . . Th . . . Th . . . Th . . . Th . . . Th . . . Th . . . That’s all folks!

Porky Pig


(For the last few months we’ve been running the best posts from years past, posts that will be new to most of our subscribers. This one is from 2014. We’ll be posting more blasts from the past for the next several months, and will intersperse them with new material.)

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English: A simple binary tree diagram illustra...

English: A simple binary tree diagram illustrating the hierarchical structure of a multi-level marketing compensation plan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The easiest way to lose supposed friends is, of course, to loan them money. As little as fifty or a hundred bucks will generally do the trick, and being rid of them is a bargain at the price. As a bonus, the minority who pay you back in a timely manner are almost always real friends.

The second easiest way is to flatly turn down a supposed friend who’s involved in a multi-level marketing (MLM) scheme — Amway, Herbalife, etc. My close friends are neither naive enough nor unethical enough to involve themselves in such pyramid scheme-like crap, but every once in a while someone I’m not especially close to will hit me up to buy overpriced MLM junk, playing the “friend” card. I simply tell them, “Don’t take it personally. I like you, but I never buy from multi-level marketers.” To date, almost every single one of them has immediately vanished. (The one in a hundred who’ll stick around is probably an actual friend, just naive. In my case I can only think of one exception.)

Try refusing the next time a “friend” tries to take advantage of you via an MLM scam. I have a strong hunch your experience will be the same as mine.


English: A simple binary tree diagram illustra...

English: A simple binary tree diagram illustrating the hierarchical structure of a multi-level marketing compensation plan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The easiest way to lose supposed friends is, of course, to loan them money. As little as fifty or a hundred bucks will generally do the trick. And being rid of them is a bargain at the price. As a bonus, the minority who pay you back in a timely manner are almost always real friends.

The second easiest way is to flatly turn down a supposed friend who’s involved in a multi-level marketing (MLM) scheme–Amway, Herbalife, etc. My close friends are neither naive enough nor unethical enough to involve themselves in such pyramid scheme-like crap, but every once in a while someone I’m not especially close to will hit me up to buy overpriced MLM junk, playing the “friend” card. I simply tell them, “Don’t take it personally. I like you, but I never buy from multi-level marketers,” To date, almost every single one of them has immediately vanished. (The one in a hundred who’ll stick around is probably an actual friend, just naive. In my case I can only think of one exception–and hello Stephen, if by chance you’re reading this.)

Try refusing the next time a “friend” tries to take advantage of you via an MLM scam. I have a strong hunch your experience will be the same as mine.